Southern Doctors

A majority of the early medical school graduates hailed from southern slave-holding states. The geographic distribution of the student population helped influence the early curriculum and shifted the focus to racialized medicine. The culmination of the students' academic careers resulted in medical theses covered southern diseases, plantation medicine, and race science. After graduation, many students went on to found their own hospitals and medical schools that put these studies into practice. Their contributions to the medical field can be seen today in the field of women's health with a focus on impairments to fertility. These practices were implemented in many southern plantations to maximize enslaved women's ability to reproduce and keep the institution of slavery alive. The racialized study of anatomy can still be seen in the medical field to this day.

Southern Doctors